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The Origins of Anti-Aging Medicine With Dr. Chris Renna

This week on the SuperAge podcast, we dive into the world of integrative and preventive medicine with Dr. Chris Renna. Dr. Renna, with a career spanning over three decades, shares his unique perspective on achieving optimal health and longevity. From discussing the nuances of detoxification and the role of the microbiome to exploring the future of biotech and AI in medicine, Dr. Renna provides a comprehensive look at modern healthcare techniques. He emphasizes the importance of individualized treatment plans and the integration of various modalities like nutrition, sleep, and exercise for overall wellbeing. The conversation challenges conventional medical thinking and charts a road map into the future of personal health management.

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Key Moments

“The Goldilocks concept is really the goal, but it is really complicated and highly individualized, meaning balance is quite subjective.”

“We’re on the verge of developing generative AI. Now we’re considering both the risks and benefits of sentience, and I think that the way our brain works, we are naturally drawn to the risk before we’re drawn to the opportunity. And I think that works, you know; like, that’s kept us here and that’s brought us forward in our technologies.”

“If God had a complete understanding of every physiologic system and all of its implications and interactions, what would God recommend we have for supper? Generative AI holds that potential. It would only inform us. So I think that, you know, the future is amazingly bright.”

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Transcript

00:00:01:01 – 00:00:04:17

David

Dr. Chris Renna, it’s wonderful to see you. Where does this podcast find you today?

00:00:04:19 – 00:00:19:06

Dr. Chris Renna

My Dallas offices. You know, as you know, we got together because I have a clinic that focuses on wellness and health and longevity. And we have operating offices right now in three cities: Los Angeles, Dallas and Miami.

00:00:19:12 – 00:00:29:17

David

And one of the reasons I’m so curious to talk to you is about the longevity of your longevity practice. You’ve been doing this since 1990 or 91.

00:00:29:20 – 00:00:31:14

Dr. Chris Renna

Yes. 1990.

00:00:31:16 – 00:00:43:21

David

I mean, I can’t recall in 1990 this being like anywhere near the hot topic and the sort of amount of media that it’s how many financial and time resources are going into this. It’s really ballooned since then.

00:00:43:23 – 00:01:22:12

Dr. Chris Renna

Oh, yeah, tremendously. 1990 actually was just before the threshold of anti-aging was coined. If there is anything that was catalytic about that year, it wasn’t my moving from an interventional or reactive practice into a preventive, proactive practice. It was a paper published in the New England Journal by an investigator named Daniel Rudman. Dr. Rudman is an endocrinologist. He published a paper in 1990 that ended up being fodder, if not fuel, for the anti-aging movement from which we now all benefit.

00:01:22:14 – 00:01:56:00

Dr. Chris Renna

What Dr. Rudman looked at was the effect of human growth hormone replacement in an elderly population of people. And what he concluded was that the resulting increase in growth factors and metabolism that that stimulated improve their their performance and ability more than people who received the placebo. Redman’s paper was an interesting paper published at the highest level of medical scrutiny that became much more interesting later on.

00:01:56:06 – 00:02:26:16

Dr. Chris Renna

A few years later, a few doctors and a lay person with a business idea got together and started an educational organization called the American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine, and it was not the only academy or place where physicians and laypeople could go for information and education on the subject. There were other groups that had predated them, but that one was the one focused on an aging.

00:02:26:18 – 00:02:50:00

Dr. Chris Renna

And I believe that the reason for that I mean, it would be interesting to interview the founders of that organization and find out from their own perspective what they think. But I remember that they were enthusiastic about not only Redman’s publication, but Redman’s idea. That year, in 1990, although it may seem much closer in time to your listening audience than we would think.

00:02:50:06 – 00:03:24:17

Dr. Chris Renna

Pretty much predated bioidentical hormone replacement ideas. There were some bioidentical hormone replacement protocols in place during that time, but they weren’t popular at all. And most people were either going hormone deficient whenever their bodies quit making them or turning to medications that acted in some ways like hormones, but were not hormones at all. 1990, I started lifespan medicine with the idea of getting into the room with a person sooner than when they had their diagnosis.

00:03:24:19 – 00:03:44:01

Dr. Chris Renna

If you think about, you know, the paradigm of reactive medicine, you develop symptoms, you go to the doctor, you tell your doctor your symptoms, your doctor names, your disease, whatever it is, and then gives you the standing therapeutic. And their job is done. Then you’re followed up by the nurse or not followed up at all, or everything is left to you.

00:03:44:03 – 00:04:24:15

Dr. Chris Renna

There’s really not much education. There’s orientation in there, but not much education in that. I had practiced primary care for ten years by 1990, and I saw in the mid 1990, mid-19th eighties that if I could just get to the person sooner than they had diabetes or sooner than they had coronary disease or sooner than they had any of the major medical diagnoses that were afflicting people, then even if I could give them some information and advice about how to minimize their exposure or susceptibility to viral illness, it was going to make a difference in their life.

00:04:24:15 – 00:04:57:16

Dr. Chris Renna

So I found it lifespan medicine with the overt goal of early detection and education mandates. Prevention and guarantees improved. Those were the basic principles. It didn’t occur to me that that would correlate to anti-aging. I didn’t really think about aging at the time, although had you asked me. Common sense would have elicited the response. Sure. You know, if you’re healthier, you’re bound to be you’re bound to live longer.

00:04:57:18 – 00:05:20:17

Dr. Chris Renna

If you don’t have diabetes, coronary disease, kidney disease, or if you’re not susceptible to pneumonia, that’s what’s going to kill you. But it wasn’t really my focus at the time. It was about early detection, mandating prevention and and patient education, avoiding disease. So it was a wellness or well-being practice. And it was a shift from insurance reimbursement to cash.

00:05:20:18 – 00:05:46:12

Dr. Chris Renna

So the financial model of cash practice was really not in existence in 1990. And one of the things that it did both for me and to me was helped me realize the value of my ability to communicate with the individual, no matter how good my information, if I couldn’t convey it to the individual, they wouldn’t be able to implement it and they wouldn’t benefit from it and they would stop coming.

00:05:46:14 – 00:06:23:07

Dr. Chris Renna

There wasn’t an endless line of sick people out the door that we’re going to come to. Me whether I knew what I was doing or not. You know, now I was really going to have to perform. And I think that the theme of that has carried forward and helped the anti-aging movement achieve legitimacy. So to keep going forward in the timeline in the early 1990, as a forum started to educate, started to bring forward ideas about anti-aging medicine, the Institute for Functional Medicine, which I believe was more the creation of dedicated professionals than a forum.

00:06:23:11 – 00:06:48:20

Dr. Chris Renna

A forum had better marketing, and they had arguably better conferences in terms of the menu of speakers. But I found Institute of Functional Medicine was really educating physicians, showing us how to take the information about integrative medicine and turn it into health care protocols that would make a difference in a person’s life. So fast forward through the 1990s.

00:06:48:22 – 00:07:15:20

Dr. Chris Renna

Other than human growth hormone or bioidentical hormone replacement, what was there? Well, there was all of the unexplored territory in medical practice of nutrition, sleep and psychology, because nutrition, sleep and psychology were really unspoken issues in the 1980s and before William Clement, a man who might arguably be the father of modern sleep medicine, didn’t publish his first book until the early eighties.

00:07:15:22 – 00:07:51:02

Dr. Chris Renna

That behavioral foundation when I founded Lifespan, I had educated my I had a bespoke education beyond my residency training for five years. And what I realized in preparing to go naked into the uninsured world and try and make a living was that I would have to know about nutrition, sleep, exercise, and I would have to understand perspective. Perspective as defined as a person’s view of themselves and their place in the world as it pertains to their daily behaviors.

00:07:51:04 – 00:08:23:08

Dr. Chris Renna

How do you get somebody to eat better? You have to start with understanding how you know the information and then conveying it to them. But you also have to understand how to support them in the process of making behavioral changes. And that’s where the behavioral psychology aspect then there was a burgeoning world of nutritional supplementation and this other world of using drugs for off label purposes, all of which have been folded into the anti-aging movement and longevity movement now that make up the cornerstones upon which we rely.

00:08:23:10 – 00:08:51:17

Dr. Chris Renna

So lifespan was organized around the idea that each of us is dependent upon diet, exercise, sleep and perspective. And that’s the superstructure of our consciousness. The superstructure of our self-concept was an inseparable interaction, ongoing and constant among neurochemicals, hormones and immune chemicals. And that, in fact, I had been taught that there was an immune system, a nervous system in an endocrine system.

00:08:51:19 – 00:09:12:09

Dr. Chris Renna

No one ever told me they worked together. No one ever pointed out the fact that those were inseparable and that every neuro modulator was an immune modulator and every immune modulator was a neuromodulation. Hormones modulated them both. And it’s like, Oh, and all this has been going on, you know, since that first cry, the first slap on the book.

00:09:12:11 – 00:09:42:23

Dr. Chris Renna

So fantastic. This is great stuff. You know, I mean, how exciting to have this new view of my medical education and my opportunity. So the superstructure upon which we rely for our consciousness is conducted through that inseparable processing. And that’s where we live until our body calls upon us, until it demands our attention or until we give it our attention, like we’re getting groomed or when we’re getting dressed or when we’re checking ourselves out.

00:09:43:01 – 00:10:24:09

Dr. Chris Renna

We all live in the self-concept, this electrical hologram that’s created by all of that chemical interaction that is evolving and being re informed and renewed on a daily basis. And that’s where we want to live. You know, we don’t want a bad knee to distract us from our ideas and our thoughts and our conversations. And really, if you think about what’s the goal of longevity, the goal of longevity is to remain so functional that you forget about your body and you just spend all your time in your ideas and in the expression of those ideals.

00:10:24:11 – 00:10:49:10

Dr. Chris Renna

It occurs to me that there would be a, you know, an audience, a paying public, and I’m still here a goal, a clinic is still going. We have three locations, not one. And so to a certain extent it was through the 1990s, didn’t conclude with the same fantastic crescendo that I had imagined. And I’ll tell you what the origins of my imaginings were.

00:10:49:12 – 00:11:16:17

Dr. Chris Renna

There was a sort of a burst of articles published about human stem cells and their potential. During my bespoke education, I barely knew. I mean, I barely remembered what a stem cell was during the beginning of that education in 85 or 86. And I found lots of articles in the medical library that were being published recently about these cells and the amazing potential of these cells in in therapies.

00:11:16:19 – 00:11:55:18

Dr. Chris Renna

So I saw stem cells now that it had the light of attention would probably become usable, would probably become valuable in a decade or two. At the same time, 1988 launched the Human Genome Project, and there was a great deal of excitement about once we mapped the human genome, we’re going to understand it, and once we understand it, we’re going to be able to manage it well, you know, in my naivete, I thought, you know, I’ve made this transition from a reactive practice to a proactive practice.

00:11:55:20 – 00:12:23:17

Dr. Chris Renna

And within ten or 15 years, everybody’s going to be doing this. Like, I’m not going to be the guy standing out or standing apart anymore. Everybody is going to be standing around me and the guys left in reactive medicine are going to be, you know, the oddballs. Well, you know, the wheels of science don’t turn that quickly. So as we’ve all seen, stem cells are still of tremendous potential and barely harnessed, barely understood.

00:12:23:18 – 00:12:53:17

Dr. Chris Renna

We learned once we mapped the human genome that there were 4.6 billion possible combinations. And like so many other models of highly complex systems, we had no ability to understand. What we could do was go to work every day and learn how to better communicate the principles and understanding that we had, how to streamline the programs, make it easier for people to adopt.

00:12:53:19 – 00:13:19:08

Dr. Chris Renna

We could stay current with the information so that what we thought about carrots means in 1995 was either confirmed or denied by 1999. And what we thought about this or that other diagnosis or tool would just continue to evolve and we would all get better and better at it. And for those people who were advised that it would be better for it, and that’s pretty much the story of lifespan.

00:13:19:08 – 00:13:28:18

Dr. Chris Renna

And I’ve taken you from 1990 to 2000 and my recollections, the moments that I’m happy to pause and let you comment or ask another question.

00:13:28:20 – 00:13:54:16

David

Thinking back in my own memory about the Human Genome Project and about all the incredible things that we were going to be able to do once we understood this and not so much. Well, not yet anyway. Not that. And I think it’s one of the things that I like the analogy of the flying car, that in 1965 I was promised a flying car.

00:13:54:18 – 00:14:19:20

David

I still don’t have a flying car. This has sort of colored my expectation on certain things. The same with like the Human Genome Project. I mean, the number of things that if some sort of come along every decade and, oh, this is going to be marvelous. Everything’s going to change and well, not so much. But I think that now maybe because I just I talked to a lot of people in this field, it feels like things are quite different and I want to sort of get to where that’s going.

00:14:19:20 – 00:14:41:05

David

But let’s I want to back up a little bit and talk about what your theories are right now and your practices in life span. So the first thing you mentioned was HGH, human growth hormone, pluses and minuses on that. Are you using this in your practice with certain patients? What what are the outcomes you’re looking at or is this something you’ve just decided this you don’t want to go there.

00:14:41:07 – 00:15:22:12

Dr. Chris Renna

If you think about the organization of my thoughts, I mentioned earlier, it’s diet, exercise, sleep perspective, hormones, immune function, brain chemistry, and HGH fits in that fifth category of hormones. That is an introduction or a member of the bigger subject, you know, the pantheon of hormones that help us avoid disease and loss functionality and growth factors. So what HGH does when you’re producing it yourself or when you’re taking it as a replacement hormone regardless of your age, is it stimulates the production of a growth factor called IGF one.

00:15:22:14 – 00:15:50:21

Dr. Chris Renna

And IGF one is very important representative of the families of growth factors that help connect metabolism in a very efficient way and therefore help us conclude the cycle of action that eating exercise and sleeping are meant to do. Growth hormone replacement. Yes. You know, we we will advise certain of our clients to take growth hormone replacement. I’ll come back and tell you why I call them clients in a moment.

00:15:50:23 – 00:16:12:20

Dr. Chris Renna

And to take growth hormone replacement, if not on an ongoing basis, then to see over a relatively long temporary period. So three months to a year of what types of improvements do they have with higher levels of growth factors. I’m going to talk about bioidentical hormones in a larger subject with other members of that pantheon in a moment.

00:16:12:20 – 00:16:52:06

Dr. Chris Renna

But growth hormone is an interesting, very interesting member of that group of tools, because what we see is that centenarians have very low growth factors. So it looks like evolutionarily our decline in growth factor production may have been beneficial at some point or for a very long period of time through evolution. It may have been beneficial to make fewer of those growth factors and have a lesser metabolism and spend fewer resources on maintaining muscle mass and connective tissue, which is what these growth factors focused on.

00:16:52:08 – 00:17:23:12

Dr. Chris Renna

Now, that’s over a very long period of food scarcity. It doesn’t look at all at at the modern day of food abundance. So when you ask the question about, well, are growth factors good to you or not, are they not good for you, as is the answer, as is in many biological subjects? Both. They’re both. One must be very careful in encouraging someone to take growth hormone or peptides which stimulate growth factors.

00:17:23:13 – 00:17:53:03

Dr. Chris Renna

There are others beyond growth hormone because there are certain common cancers that are very growth factor sensitive. So far there’s no prove relationship in causation. If you take growth hormone, you’re not increasing your chance of having a growth factor sensitive cancer. But if you’re biologically leads you to develop one of those cancers and you’re on that growth hormone growth factor stimulant, then you’re going to be helping that tumor.

00:17:53:05 – 00:18:19:17

Dr. Chris Renna

And you know, that’s probably the last thing you ever want to do is help you to to prescribe or recommend growth hormone responsibly. One must not only understand all of the physiologic connections that that that is going to or may bring about, but also be sure that the person who’s taking it has kept up with their checkups and is used as much modern technology as possible to know that they don’t currently have one of those, too.

00:18:19:22 – 00:18:38:22

David

I want to stop you there. Let’s talk about when you use the word checkup and modern technology, modern cancer screening. So there are blood based tests that one can take. Grail, I believe, is the best known. There are other sort of full body MRI’s there. I don’t know what else is out there when someone comes to see you for a checkup.

00:18:39:00 – 00:18:45:14

David

I’m guessing it’s extensive. So what are the sort of tests that you’re performing on people?

00:18:45:18 – 00:19:33:08

Dr. Chris Renna

But we employ the two technologies that you mentioned. GRAIL for your listeners is the Lab Gallery is the test itself. Excuse me? The gallery test is as far as we have come in terms of looking at the unique biochemical products of tumors and being able to identify them when they not so much are existent in the body, but when they have reached a level that predicts a tumor because there are many tumor starts that the immune system recognizes and destroys and those tumor starts produce some of those byproducts that could be measured in the blood, but it would never go anywhere if the gallery tests had such a low sense and such a high sensitivity

00:19:33:08 – 00:20:01:14

Dr. Chris Renna

that it indentified precancerous molecules or cancerous molecules, it would not be very accurate. And so what that laboratory had to figure out was where do we draw the line and how sensitive can we be without becoming Chicken Little? You know, telling every person who has our tests that always think you have a cancer, there’s an antibody that the immune system makes in response to cancer called anti malignant antibody.

00:20:01:14 – 00:20:27:18

Dr. Chris Renna

It was it was the predecessor of the gallery test in the 1990s. And when I learned of it, I incorporated in all my exams and everybody had it. And it really disturbed a lot of people, including me, because everybody had this antibody that was being made in their body in response to cancer. Now is this a search for where is the tumor?

00:20:27:20 – 00:20:57:03

Dr. Chris Renna

And it turns out everybody has it all the time. And you know, mitotic breaks and cancer swarming all the time. And you know, what goes on to become a clinical significant cancer. That’s what we had to figure out. And the gallery test has really taken the first step in that direction. It’s going to get much better. It’ll learn from all of us participating and continue to research how to identify stage one cancers more accurately.

00:20:57:05 – 00:21:21:03

Dr. Chris Renna

Right now it does not. It doesn’t have the sensitive beauty necessary to detect most stage one cancers, but it gets better at stage two, really good at stage three. Of course, you know, we all detect that at stage four. So the gallery test is one that we do. Something less technological is a skin inspection for melanoma. Melanoma is one of the common tumors that growth factor sensitive.

00:21:21:05 – 00:21:48:20

Dr. Chris Renna

So having a dermatologist look at you with a magnifying glass standing in your birthday suit or as close to that as your dermatologist wants you to, that can be very helpful. And I think that’s one of the tests that we would have. We have all our clients do, especially if a client is going to start or is taking growth factor stimulants and dental examinations.

00:21:48:22 – 00:22:10:21

Dr. Chris Renna

Most people meet with their hygienist quarterly or more often than that. We encourage that. But everybody should meet with their dentist at least once a year and have the dentist glove up and feel your jaw line and seal your cheeks and your lips and look carefully down your throat because they’re the overseers of oropharyngeal cancers, you know, they’ve got to tell us whether we have one of those or have something.

00:22:10:21 – 00:22:43:20

Dr. Chris Renna

What’s suspicious in terms of reproductive organ examinations, of course, pelvic exams, pelvic ultrasounds, breast ultrasounds, mammography when appropriate, prostate imaging or prostate examination, prostate blood tests, the PSA, the MDX, a number of other tests that look at cancerous factors that are might be being produced by your prostate gland. All of those things are on our list of the early the our responsibility to our health and the early detection of this tumor.

00:22:43:22 – 00:23:15:11

Dr. Chris Renna

So, yes, we employ all those technologies we understand and promote recommend bioidentical hormone replacement. Even though bioidentical hormone replacement has yet to be proved to extend lifespan. So, you know, you may think that that’s a conflict with our goals for longevity better than hormone replacement increases functionality. I don’t know that anyone has invested the money in part because biochemical hormones are not patented products, they’re naturally occurring substances.

00:23:15:13 – 00:23:50:16

Dr. Chris Renna

So the profitability in researching and selling them is, you know, much less. I’m not aware of any papers that say that biochemical hormone replacement extend life. Getting back to the centenarians and the growth factors, though, I think in the way we manage it at lifespan is that if your health related goals, your health related needs and your laboratory tests line, those three factors can make you an absolute really good candidate for growth factor stimulation through peptides, your growth hormone replacement.

00:23:50:18 – 00:24:21:07

Dr. Chris Renna

It’s even clearer when you’re talking about estrogen in women and testosterone in men. And yet the same caveat exists. You have to be sure that they don’t have an estrogen sensitive or, you know, androgen sensitive tumor. So, again, you know, I think I’m over answering your questions, so I want to pause and let you have a chance. But that’s our thought about hormone replacement in that scheme of, you know, those are important topics.

00:24:21:11 – 00:24:51:15

David

What comes to mind is the balance between optimizing current functionality, I guess, and then the sort of future tradeoff on that example that really comes to mind is I know a lot of high performing athletes and with a high performing athlete, it’s all about this sort of window of time, maximum performance, and they’re not thinking too much about what happens 30, 40, 50 years down the road.

00:24:51:17 – 00:25:13:16

David

But I think the through lesser extent, the same paradigm can be done for people who are in their 5070s. And are you having these kind of conversations with folks are saying like, hey, well, yeah, you may feel better and be stronger now, but maybe this isn’t long term best for you or is there sort of a Goldilocks center there that we aim for.

00:25:13:18 – 00:25:47:11

Dr. Chris Renna

In those choices? The Goldilocks concept is really the goal, but the Goldilocks concept is really a more complicated and highly individualized. Then, you know, then the allegory, meaning balance is quite a subject and achieving balance. Now, when we’re talking about, let’s just say objective measurements of balance, a person comes in and they have high adrenal stress hormone and low adrenal raw material.

00:25:47:15 – 00:26:20:22

Dr. Chris Renna

They have imbalances of their reproductive hormones, they have thyroid out of whack. Their growth factors are too low or their binding protein, which neutralizes the growth factors. Fact is too high. You know, you have one of these, you know, very chaotic hormonal profile males. And we we think that the best way to handle that is to go back to the foundation and look at diet, exercise, sleep and perspective.

00:26:21:00 – 00:26:41:17

Dr. Chris Renna

I didn’t think of it in the moment, but I could relate. The hormone picture I gave you to each of those topics about what goes up or down with insufficient sleep and what goes up or down with too much stress and what goes up or down with, you know, a high carbohydrate sugar diet or for that matter, high fat diet.

00:26:41:18 – 00:27:22:01

Dr. Chris Renna

So all of that corresponds. And so the you know, our approach is your longevity with today’s abilities. Your longevity is going to be 80% dependent upon your daily habits and behaviors and 20%, 20% influenced by tools. If you use every tool that’s proved and if you can’t afford every tool that’s proved or you don’t want to afford, every tool is true, You don’t have the time to afford every tool, then okay, then it’ll be more dependent upon behavior and less dependent upon tools.

00:27:22:01 – 00:27:49:00

Dr. Chris Renna

But right now it’s about an 8020 deal. I anticipate you asking me at some point, what do I think about the future? And I’ll preempt that now and say that I think that in ten years it’ll be a 7030 and I think in 25 years will be 5050. As long as we live in this hulking somatic form, we’re not going to escape or or succeed.

00:27:49:02 – 00:27:57:18

Dr. Chris Renna

The impact of diet, exercise and sleep or avoid the impact of perspective.

00:27:57:20 – 00:28:22:08

Dr. Chris Renna

So as long as we’re still based to this, you know, in this carbon system, carbon based system, futuristic ideas, you know, sound like fiction until they’re real. And there may come a time for humanity. And I I’d be happy to explain to you why I think this is even a valid thing to say. There may come a time when we’re not so biologically based.

00:28:22:10 – 00:28:53:02

Dr. Chris Renna

As I described earlier, most of us live in the world of the self generated informatics, and what we’ve seen is that there are less needy and more reliable systems of informatics than the human body. Again, I’ll forecast what am I really what am I excited about? And I’m excited about things in biology, but I’m also very I’m intrigued and very excited about things in informatics.

00:28:53:04 – 00:29:27:21

Dr. Chris Renna

We’re on the verge of developing generative A.I. and we have developed generative. Now we’re considering both the risks and benefits of sentience, and I think that the way our brain works, we are naturally drawn to the risk before we’re drawn to the opportunity. And I think that works, you know, like that’s kept that’s kept us here and that’s brought us forward in our technologies as we’ve come to the on.

00:29:27:23 – 00:30:00:08

Dr. Chris Renna

So I think we do need to be cautious about generative A.I. and about controls for that. And I think we need to be even more cautious about setting a high. But it’s clear to me that one brilliant individual or an entire civilization of brilliant individuals don’t have the ability to understand complex systems as much as we need to understand them to minimize, if not eliminate, every human vulnerability.

00:30:00:10 – 00:30:23:21

Dr. Chris Renna

So I’m interested in A.I. and its impact on biotech, its impact on medical practice, on the specific areas of my interest, which is the early detection and changing future of disease. I’m also interested in the things that are going to happen. I think perhaps sooner with or without any AI, will we learn to use stem cells in some really productive way?

00:30:24:01 – 00:30:45:07

Dr. Chris Renna

I think the answer to that is yes, and I think we already have and we will. Are we going to be able to use CRISPR, the gene modification, science and technology, to change the fate of people with genetically based diseases and then to change the expression of genes through epigenetic manipulations to give us an opportunity to all be healthier for a long period of time.

00:30:45:09 – 00:31:18:03

Dr. Chris Renna

It’s a lock. That’s my ten year thought. Are we going to understand and be able to correct problems in our nutritional resources, relatively nutrient empty American diet? I don’t think we’re going to have the opportunity or ability to correct our farming techniques, but I think the technology as technology has in a very crude way through the development of 100,000 dietary supplements, almost all of which have some side benefit, I think we’ll be able to organize that better.

00:31:18:05 – 00:31:44:16

Dr. Chris Renna

And if not engineer foods, then be able to identify the food qualities of our dietary sources so that we can really figure out is a carrot bought at my supermarket? What’s its nutrient density compared to the carrot I’m buying at the farmer’s market? Is there a real difference in Is there enough of a difference? And do I need three of these carrots in order to make up what I you know what I’m looking for?

00:31:44:18 – 00:32:18:10

Dr. Chris Renna

I think that just more information about that. Think about if a group or organization of individuals were to get together, solicit the contributions of a recognized group of elite thinkers, as well as review all of the existing database, I’m back to the AEI model again. That group or that program could create what I do without the limitations of the medical mind of Chris Renner and approach the freedoms of the medical mind of God.

00:32:18:12 – 00:32:50:06

Dr. Chris Renna

If God had a complete understanding of every physiologic system and all of its implications and interactions, what would God recommend we have for supper? I hold that potential generative and I hold that potential. You know, we wouldn’t need a sentient air to tell us it’s it’s to judge us. It would only inform us. So I think that, you know, the future is amazingly bright, so substantially, so substantial.

00:32:50:06 – 00:33:28:12

Dr. Chris Renna

Now, you know, earlier I mentioned that there was scientific basis and that the principles of scientific basis should underlie all of the changes in the behavior that we make. And it should be carefully, considerately applied by a practitioner, an informed practitioner with whom we’re partnering on this. I call the people who come to me for advice clients because the physician patient relationship has an inherent hierarchy that takes agency from the individual and loans it to the expert.

00:33:28:14 – 00:34:03:07

Dr. Chris Renna

And what I learned in my early years at lifespan is if they think of me as their doctor, they’re going to rely upon me to change their behavior. And I can’t change their behavior. They’re going to have to rely upon themselves to do that. And so I’ve got to be the same guy as their tax accountant, or I have to be the same guy as their retirement advisor, meaning I have to be an advisor consultant, but they have to have both the agency and power necessary to make the changes that they for the results they see.

00:34:03:09 – 00:34:27:03

Dr. Chris Renna

It’s an exciting, really exciting time. And you know, you reflecting on how long I’ve been doing this, I don’t know that something that is so demanding in so many different ways. I don’t know that I could ever have continued to do it or to be as enthusiastic about it as I am. If it weren’t this compelling and it wasn’t this rewarding.

00:34:27:05 – 00:34:53:00

David

I want to note that the client practitioner relationship that you outline I think is one of the biggest changes that I personally experienced in the 65 years that I’ve been walking around. That didn’t used to be the case. And that’s how I personally deal with all of my practitioners. And you know, we have a discussion and then, okay, so what do you think and what am I willing to do?

00:34:53:00 – 00:35:17:20

David

And and I like that partnership. I don’t know if everyone does, but I do. You’re very optimistic about the future, but I want to temper that with some things here. My guess is since 1991, I mean, we talked about the Human Genome Project, which has been interesting so far, but not really that impactful. What are some of the other things that have you’ve come across that you just thought were like, Oh my gosh, this is amazing.

00:35:17:20 – 00:35:24:14

David

I can’t wait to bring this into my practice and my work out so well.

00:35:24:16 – 00:35:31:04

Dr. Chris Renna

Oh, I see. So the things that I was excited about until I tried to use them and found out they weren’t as powerful as that.

00:35:31:06 – 00:35:32:09

David

That’s right.

00:35:32:11 – 00:36:19:22

Dr. Chris Renna

Sure. So one of the things that we ask people to do is to support their nutritional needs through dietary supplementation. And one of the innovations ten or 15 years ago, which moved us away from multiple capsules, pills and gels, a simpler format were individualized pre-formed powders. So there was a period of time where I had an opportunity to send the nutrients that I wanted you to take on a regular basis to a company that then formulated powders, send you a powder with all those ingredients and a machine, and you could make a daily beverage out of that, you know, similar to the protein shake that many of our clients rely upon to make sure they

00:36:19:22 – 00:36:38:23

Dr. Chris Renna

meet their protein needs. And instead of you standing in front of the blender with this, all these jars of vitamins, opening it up and pouring the powder or crushing the gel or the pulverizing the pill, this company was going to do it for you. And I thought, this is great. This is terrific. It’s going to change everything. We’re going to have to switch our pharmacy over to this.

00:36:38:23 – 00:37:00:08

Dr. Chris Renna

In fact, it may close our pharmacy. You know, these guys may take over the industry, frankly. Now, it was more people got the machines, they got the powders. They did it for a couple of weeks, a couple of months. Then it was like, can you send me those pills again? Or they would come for the annual examination. It’s like, So how are you doing on that, that vitamin formula to go, Oh God, I don’t know.

00:37:00:08 – 00:37:24:08

Dr. Chris Renna

I don’t know where that thing is. I have to find it. You know, I have ask the housekeeper. I think she put it in the closet. That didn’t go over that big. The science and technology of hormone pellets, hormone implants, full disclosure, we offer hormone implants, testosterone implants or female biochemical hormone implants to our clientele. Some of my physician associates at lifespan are much more enthusiastic about that.

00:37:24:08 – 00:37:52:23

Dr. Chris Renna

And I am I’m not a strong promoter of hormone pellet implantations because the slow release system that they depend upon has not yet been perfected. So for me, let’s just say that any 65 year old male comes in with a total testosterone of 350, which is barely above the normal range or in the normal range, and a free testosterone of five, which is below the normal range.

00:37:53:01 – 00:38:16:12

Dr. Chris Renna

And a list of symptoms hormone deficiency should be a clinical diagnosis, not a laboratory diagnosis. So a list of symptoms that corresponds to this person suffering from insufficiency. And I’ll just put an asterisk by that to say that some people have very low levels of circulating hormones, very high sensitivity to those same hormones. They don’t need any more.

00:38:16:14 – 00:38:41:10

Dr. Chris Renna

But the vast majority of people who come in, 65 year old guy, low levels and nine of the 12 complaints that are attached to testosterone deficiency, if we put those pellets in a week later, that guy is going to go from 350 to 1500 and he’s going to go from, you know, five milligrams of free testosterone to 25 milligrams pre testosterone.

00:38:41:15 – 00:39:14:08

Dr. Chris Renna

And that’s just too much acceleration. That whole idea about, hey, I can make this much simpler with this slow release technology has it really, in my view, hasn’t really been achieved yet. What other things were great? I mean, I, I have looked at the stem cell programs. Those at home and abroad. And for your listeners who aren’t informed, we are physicians in the United States are not enabled to use stem cells other than those we harvest from your own body.

00:39:14:08 – 00:39:44:18

Dr. Chris Renna

And when we use those stem cells, we harvest them either from body fat or from bone marrow. And we have to not do anything to condition or change them and we have to give them back to you within a very short period of time. Those are all the restrictions that we function under. If you go abroad, you can receive a whole variety of stem cells from different age people and from different sources, umbilical cord and cloned populations.

00:39:44:18 – 00:40:20:23

Dr. Chris Renna

And you can even get the extracts from these stem cells which seem to be a core value of them in the form of exosomes. And you can have these, you know, period thickly. And each time my clients have gone abroad to get these, they’ve reported a blush of improvement for a brief period of time what we’re all looking forward to is when you could have those same those same stem cell treatments here in the United States for much less cost unless hassle.

00:40:21:01 – 00:40:53:12

Dr. Chris Renna

And we would learn how to orient those stem cells to not only dissolve and release their valuable contents into your blood, which gives you the blush of improvement for eight weeks or 12 weeks. But we would learn to speak to those stem and tell them what we need. Like, I need more cartilage in my needs. I need, you know, better protein elimination systems in my hippocampal portion of my brain.

00:40:53:14 – 00:41:11:12

Dr. Chris Renna

And in fact, I need more functioning neurons in my spinal cord to maintain my agility and balance. And right now, we can’t rely upon stem cells for any of that. I think I, I definitely thought that we we would have been able to upon them. Not yet.

00:41:11:13 – 00:41:30:19

David

I think this is this is fascinating. I realize I’m going to be asking you to perhaps give some information you don’t want to do. You know, we’ve talked about various kinds of testing. We’re talking about hormone replacement sergeant’s molecules, sirolimus, rapamycin people. A lot of people are enthusiastic about that. And some other things out there. What are you seeing?

00:41:30:21 – 00:41:56:22

David

This sort of generalized client population that you’re seeing is actually moving the needle? You’ve you’ve talked about this a20 so 20 is actually a substantial move you can make with the needle. So what are the what are the sort of technologies, the sort of therapies that you see that it really do move the needle outside of those initial You spoke about sleep nutrition and the psychology of the client.

00:41:57:00 – 00:42:00:23

David

What are the things additional to that you’re seeing actually move the needle?

00:42:01:01 – 00:42:31:21

Dr. Chris Renna

Sure. And now I am talking about our programs. It would be paradoxical if not silly of me to talk about things that we could be employing today that would be a benefit to our clientele that we were not employed today. So everything I’m about to describe can be part of a program for an individual at lifespan. The menu of these things is varies only by the time that you come to lifespan and your individual needs.

00:42:31:23 – 00:42:56:10

Dr. Chris Renna

So what I mean by that is do we do everything to everybody? No, we don’t do everything that everybody over time, if you give us enough time, we probably will because we will find the the value at the right time and the sequencing of these procedures. But let’s talk about the sort of super anti-aging program, the super rampaging program begins with detoxification.

00:42:56:13 – 00:43:19:14

Dr. Chris Renna

And let’s assume that everyone we’re talking about is 35 or older. We go through developmental epigenetic changes in our toes that basically cast our our feet for the rest of our lives. And so it may not you don’t know what to do for the 19 year old or the 24 year old. Yes. I mean, there are some things we do.

00:43:19:14 – 00:43:39:20

Dr. Chris Renna

We take we take care of a good number of young professional athletes at a very high level of performance. And there are certainly things in that for a schema of diet, exercise, sleep and perspective that can be very influential to their selves in their careers. But let’s just talk about the general, you know, the likely person who comes to lifespan between age 35 and age 85.

00:43:40:01 – 00:44:12:03

Dr. Chris Renna

And in that 50 years, what are we going to think about? We’re going to think about detoxification, because every year after 25 or 30, you’re producing more toxins in the body than you can eliminate. And some of those toxins cannot be eliminated through your biological process. So they’re going to be there. When you’re 85. You’re making some byproducts of metabolism that are going to either circulate, remain bound in membranes or to cells for the rest of those 50 years.

00:44:12:05 – 00:44:34:09

Dr. Chris Renna

We can detoxify those. You can you can grab those and draw them out, or you can enhance the elimination process to get much better washing of the membranes and much better detachment of the superficial receptor binders. And you can move them out of the blood, you can move them out of the blood through the balance, through the urine.

00:44:34:11 – 00:44:58:03

Dr. Chris Renna

You can move it out of the blood through filtration. So detoxification is one of the first steps. Where are the majority of those toxins coming from? Well, they’re coming from the invisible input of the environment. We can’t see the environment, but we know it’s affecting us and we know that we’re absorbing some of the toxins from that environment that we can’t get rid of.

00:44:58:05 – 00:45:26:13

Dr. Chris Renna

So they’re coming from the invisible environment. They’re coming from our own metabolism. You know, every time we combust a carbohydrate with an oxygen molecule, we get energy waste and damage. Two out of three of those things aren’t good for us. Two out of three of those things limit our lifespan. Where are they coming from? They’re coming from the the the process of metabolism, but they’re also coming from cells that have reached a point of what’s called senescence.

00:45:26:15 – 00:46:11:15

Dr. Chris Renna

Now, senescence is an understood term and it can be applied in many different definitions, but the definition I’m describing is a senescent cell is a cell that has reached its last capable, capable replication. When cells reach the last time they can replicate. And this involves telomere science, and it also involves other aspects of science in cell biology. When they reach that last replication, they’re supposed to undergo April ptosis, which is a process of self dismantling, and the AP ptosis process is advantageous because it saves and recycles the usable parts while neutralizing the toxic parts.

00:46:11:20 – 00:46:42:23

Dr. Chris Renna

And what we’ve learned over the by Jim Kirkland’s work at Mayo Clinic over the last 15 years is we are made up of depending on our age, we’re made up of a preponderance of these senescent cells, and the senescent cells aren’t comparable to an elderly dependent population, and that’s a population that uses resources without benefit to the organization or the whole and is toxic to the extent that it cannot really control its membrane dynamics.

00:46:43:01 – 00:47:08:01

Dr. Chris Renna

So things that are made within that cell that should never be secreted are secreted into the cellular community. And one of the things that a different set of investigators in Kirkland showed was that the more senescent cells you have, the faster you age your younger self. So an older cell population in a senescent population ages young cells, that’s why age accelerates.

00:47:08:01 – 00:47:29:11

Dr. Chris Renna

That’s one of the factors and one of the reasons that age accelerates. We need to get rid of this population of older cells. You know, we’re talking about liver cells, brain cells, kidney gut membrane cells. When I’m talking about individuals, poor people, you don’t need get rid of our elderly population. We need to get rid of our elderly cells so that it will slow down the accumulation of these toxins.

00:47:29:13 – 00:47:58:14

Dr. Chris Renna

Because depending on your age and your physiologic profile, that’s your greatest source of toxicity issue cell. Okay. How do we do that? You do it through detoxification combined with central lysis. You mentioned rapamycin Sirolimus a moment ago. It’s a well-known drug used off label to encourage senescence. Jim Kirkland’s modeled use a drug called this that’s in combination with a nutrient called Quercetin.

00:47:58:16 – 00:48:19:20

Dr. Chris Renna

So we treat our patients with rapamycin and the samsonov and quercetin at different intervals in order to continuously cull the population of senescent cells in order to reduce toxicity, in order to enhance the physiologic endpoints.

00:48:19:22 – 00:48:40:00

David

I want to stop you for a second. So if you’re giving somebody a D-plus cue protocol, what are the markers that you’re looking at to see, Did this work, did this now work? You’re looking at methylation tests, you’re looking at biomarker, or is how are you how you judging whether the whatever the treatment is, it’s rapid or other things are?

00:48:40:01 – 00:48:43:23

David

How do you know that it’s actually working? Like what? What do the indicators you’re looking at?

00:48:44:01 – 00:49:12:04

Dr. Chris Renna

We’re looking at indirect markers, and that’s mostly because there are there are yet no identified direct markers. So we’re looking at indirect markers and we’re looking at viral load, we’re looking at immune system profiles, we’re looking at other variables, including DNA, including Olmec age. I’m sure you know what that is. And many of your listeners might be interested in the omega age discussion.

00:49:12:06 – 00:49:42:21

Dr. Chris Renna

So we are looking at that. We’re looking at telomere length, but not so much for that purpose because we don’t see the relationship between central lysis and extension of telomeres. It looks like telomeres predict the need for finish lines and they don’t describe the aftermath. So we’re looking at all of the easily accessible, currently affordable markers, and they’re all indirect because to my knowledge there are no direct markers as yet.

00:49:42:23 – 00:50:18:07

Dr. Chris Renna

We’re going to have to identify much more specific agents that can tell us that, you know, like the first thing we to know is how much have we reduced the senescent population? So you have to be able to quantify the senescent population or something that’s constant or consistent with their contribution to general physiology. And then the second thing would be what are the markers of improvement if we see this level lowered, is that sufficient or are we looking for the replacement of those things now generated by the younger self?

00:50:18:10 – 00:50:43:12

Dr. Chris Renna

So how do we measure the contribution of younger cells? The attraction of older cells? We’re going to have to develop those technologies. So yes, we are measuring things and we are seeing a laboratory difference. Subjective responses are just that. You know, the very anecdotal, I have people who go abroad and spend $150,000 on stem cell replacement, come back and say, I didn’t feel a thing.

00:50:43:14 – 00:51:14:20

Dr. Chris Renna

You know, I had traveler’s diarrhea. So it’s like, oh, that was a wholly unsuccessful endeavor. And people going to the same program and coming back and saying, you know, my one rep, maximum strength in the gym increased by 25% in one week. My maximum bench press was 180. It went to 220. Okay, that’s fantastic. You know, biological individuality makes up the difference, but there’s also a lot of subjectivity that goes into those experiences.

00:51:14:22 – 00:51:35:07

Dr. Chris Renna

What you conditioned yourself to think in the beginning and and how that affirms or denies what you thought at the end. And what was the experience like? Did they have trouble with the I.V.? Did you get traveler’s diarrhea? Did it cause twice as much as you thought it was? You know, all of the subjective back so subjectively, Yes, we see improvement.

00:51:35:09 – 00:52:09:16

Dr. Chris Renna

We don’t see anybody who goes through the program of detoxification Center lysis for the next step, which is plasmapheresis, plasmapheresis or H. Reese’s is a process by which you can use several different techniques to filter out identifiable products in the blood. And it’s approved by FDA and around almost as long that were longer than lifespan. And it has been used and applied very effectively in reducing auto immune antibody load.

00:52:09:18 – 00:52:26:00

Dr. Chris Renna

But it’s also been shown to be able to remove a lot of other substances that cannot be removed from the blood. Some of those toxins I talked about earlier and I’ll come back and define toxin in a minute. Some of those toxins I talked about earlier can’t be removed by your body. You have to get a magnet. Take them out.

00:52:26:05 – 00:52:53:01

Dr. Chris Renna

A toxin. By the way, in this discussion is any substance in the body that no longer has a defined positive purpose. So toxin and poison in this subject for this conversation is different. So a toxin may be an inert compound that your body made that it can’t get rid of. And it may not have any activity ever, but it’s still in the way you know, it’s still part of you that no longer is purposeful.

00:52:53:03 – 00:53:19:19

Dr. Chris Renna

And as we grow older, we can’t afford that. We have to reduce that toxicity in order to make way for easier and more efficient physiology. So detoxification center lysis plasmapheresis. We like the the energy devices and I’m on very solid ground with those first three subjects, and I’m on less solid ground now. But we believe the PMP is beneficial.

00:53:19:19 – 00:53:51:23

Dr. Chris Renna

We believe that red light therapy is beneficial and like anything else, it’s beneficial when you’re using the most advanced technology in the most approved protocol. So if you buy a red light box and sit in front of a red light box at a distance of so many feet that you just assembled because of that, where it fits in your room, where it fits in your gym, you may not be getting the value that you were seeking.

00:53:51:23 – 00:54:10:06

Dr. Chris Renna

You may not be getting any value at all. It depends on the wavelength of the red light and the distance between you and the red light. So you have to do this with with good information. You have to get people who really understand this to tell you which PMF to use and how frequently to use it and in what circumstance and how is it applied.

00:54:10:06 – 00:54:40:20

Dr. Chris Renna

And same thing with red light, hyperbaric oxygen. You know, there are lots affordable hyperbaric oxygen tents that use an oxygen concentrator to create 100% oxygen, an environment within a tent at 1.4 atmospheres, which is only 4/10 of an atmosphere, more than what you and I are experiencing in this moment. Well, none of the research that says that hyperbaric oxygen changes longevity or even health functionality uses anything less than 2.0 atmospheres.

00:54:40:20 – 00:55:05:00

Dr. Chris Renna

And none of those little plastic tubes can tolerate them. You have to go the distance, meaning you have to go to a hyperbaric oxygen center or spend money to install one of these in your gym. And then according to the, you know, the research done in Israel to gain the benefit, you’d have to spend 60 hours every 90 days in the chamber.

00:55:05:02 – 00:55:34:15

Dr. Chris Renna

We discussed that with our clientele. We would certainly encourage that. And for some disease diagnoses, it may be really important, but we don’t really encourage people to install 2.0 chambers or 2.0 chain medical device. Right? There are some very good benefits associated with infrared sauna, and we are proponents of the infrared sauna. There are good and some different benefits from wet sauna, more traditional type.

00:55:34:17 – 00:56:12:22

Dr. Chris Renna

We will inform our clientele of that and encourage them to do either or both. We see the benefits of cold plunge, especially juxtaposed to heating. We see the addition of certain breathing patterns popularized by Wim Hof through media founded by the Ayer Vedic basis of medicine to eight or 9000 years ago. Yogic breathing we see combining heat exposure, cold plunge, breathing techniques as being highly therapeutic and therefore rejuvenating in their own ways.

00:56:12:22 – 00:56:33:04

Dr. Chris Renna

And you can, you know, if you want to spend the money on analyzing blood tests before and after, you can prove that one of the areas that is new and I would say very hidden, that I think you’ll see you may see more on it. It’ll depend on a lot of different factors that I can’t really predict today.

00:56:33:06 – 00:57:02:01

Dr. Chris Renna

But one of the alternative treatments for cancer and untreatable infection over the last 25 or 30 years has been hypothermia. Hypothermia is heating the body, inducing a fever. We know that fever induction is a response by our immune system to a very specific set of circumstances that can be lifesaving in meningitis life.

00:57:02:03 – 00:57:45:02

Dr. Chris Renna

We’ve learned that if you have the ability to control brain temperature, which I would just mention for your listeners, I’m unaware of any clinic outside the United States that has that technology. So you could go for hypothermia treatments either for health and longevity, for cancer or for untreatable infection. But I wouldn’t recommend if you have the ability to accurately measure deep brain temperature while you’re raising the body temperature, you can bring about some very valuable therapeutic responses because it’s such a defined and specific narrow application.

00:57:45:02 – 00:58:03:17

Dr. Chris Renna

There’s not a lot of science on its benefits other than its use in neurodegenerative disease, untreatable infection like drug resistant tuberculosis of a line or cancer. But we think that’s a burgeoning area of science that in the next ten years will become developed and more accessible to this.

00:58:03:19 – 00:58:21:11

David

Wonderful we’ve talked about so much, and I don’t want to bore our people with have too much of their time. I just quickly want to ask you, can you summarize how you would detoxify someone? A number of these things we’ve talked about here sort of fall into that that Venn diagram. But if I come to you and I say, okay, detoxify me, what would you do?

00:58:21:12 – 00:58:23:11

David

Yeah.

00:58:23:13 – 00:58:57:18

Dr. Chris Renna

It would of course be customized to your profile, but in general we could use intravenous phosphatidylcholine, intravenous folic acid, we could use intravenous vitamin C, and we can take blood from you, snake the blood and reintroduce the blood in a very short period of time that will hyper oxygenate you, making it easier to move toxic substances from the membrane into the circulation and out of out of the circulation through the usual elimination.

00:58:57:20 – 00:59:25:21

Dr. Chris Renna

At the same time, we can identify which nutrient deficiencies are most likely impacting your inability to detoxify. We can look at a huge area of contribution to either the toxicity or detoxification process, which is the microbiome. You do that through one of several, not many, but several stool analysis tests. We can look at salivary microbiome for the mouth.

00:59:26:00 – 00:59:51:09

Dr. Chris Renna

We can look at the upper digestive tract microbiome testing too, and we can, if we coordinate these different measures so that we’re not asking you to overlap or duplicate or do things that are either going to be conflicting or non purposeful. We can do a very efficient detoxification central lysis plasmapheresis program in as few as three months. It’s not just doable.

00:59:51:09 – 01:00:20:23

Dr. Chris Renna

We’re doing it. We’ve been doing it for a while and we are seeing both object of and subject of improvements. I won’t say even more like more exciting things, but there are more exciting things to talk about. I don’t know about fatigue or for that matter, your. David there. There are more things to talk about. Exosomes are huge Exosomes are the language of the body.

01:00:21:01 – 01:00:39:13

Dr. Chris Renna

So if you think about it for a moment, you cut your finger and over a period of 3 to 5 days, your finger heals. What happened. Like, exactly how did that happen? When you cut your finger, you bled, you put pressure on it, the bleeding stopped, you put a Band-Aid on it. You might have put some antibiotic ointment on.

01:00:39:13 – 01:01:10:09

Dr. Chris Renna

Okay, great. What’s happened? What’s happened is immune system cells were called by the damaged cells to the site of the laceration, as were stem cells. And when the immune system cells, the stem cells showed up on the scene, they had to communicate to initiate the process that would ultimately result in your healing. What’s their length? How do they speak to to Exosome?

01:01:10:11 – 01:01:44:06

Dr. Chris Renna

Exosomes is the lingua franca of the human body of the mammalian body. It may be the lingua franca of everybody. And how exciting is that? And understanding how to condition a stem cell population or an immune system population. If in my simplistic paradigm, the immune system is giving instructions to the stem cell that it interpreted from the damaged cell, if that’s how the conversation ensues, we could get a form of immune system cells, white blood cells.

01:01:44:06 – 01:02:26:06

Dr. Chris Renna

We could get a form of stem cells, certainly more capable than yours or mine, some 19 year old young lady or some, you know, 19 minute old person, a girl, only girl. STEM cells are, valuable female. But we could harvest those cells. We could then communicate with those cells as if it was the site of an illustration. Harvest the exosome contents and have those chemical have those exosome contents to give to people even before they before they showed signs of wear and tear, before they showed signs of injury or inefficient processes.

01:02:26:08 – 01:02:29:17

Dr. Chris Renna

This is really exciting topic. Exosomes Really exciting.

01:02:29:19 – 01:02:49:14

David

Chris Huge amount of information there. Thank you so much. I love the longevity of lifespan if I were like a marketing guy, I would do something with that. It’s really good. Thank you so much. We’ll put contact information in the show notes and even when get in touch with you or with Lifespan, this has been tremendously informative. I really appreciate your time.

01:02:49:14 – 01:02:51:02

David

I know you’re a super busy guy.

01:02:51:04 – 01:03:05:08

Dr. Chris Renna

I enjoyed it too. I, I don’t think I could have enjoyed it more. And I would say that, you know, anyone who does reach out, we’d be happy to help them in any way that we can in terms of working together. Everybody’s welcome.

01:03:05:10 – 01:03:09:21

David

Thank you. Take care now. Bye bye. Bye.

See medical disclaimer below. ↓

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The ideas expressed here are solely the opinions of the author and are not researched or verified by AGEIST LLC, or anyone associated with AGEIST LLC. This material should not be construed as medical advice or recommendation, it is for informational use only. We encourage all readers to discuss with your qualified practitioners the relevance of the application of any of these ideas to your life. The recommendations contained herein are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. You should always consult your physician or other qualified health provider before starting any new treatment or stopping any treatment that has been prescribed for you by your physician or other qualified health provider. Please call your doctor or 911 immediately if you think you may have a medical or psychiatric emergency.

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