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Semaglutide, Ozempic, and Weight Loss: Erin Keyes & Anissa Buckley

What are peptides? What about semaglutide? Are these safe to take for weight loss? How does aging and menopause impact weight gain? What is the importance of lifestyle changes to improve our health? Learn more about B-Untethered and Telegenixx https://b-untethered.com/rule-midlife-jumpstart/.

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Erin Keyes is the co-founder and CEO of Telegenixx, a company expanding access to personalized regenerative care and peptide- or hormone-based treatment. Anissa Buckley is the founder of B-Untethered, a menopause company integrating science into a results-focused, personalized, specific lifestyle plan just for you. Erin and Anissa join us to discuss peptides, semaglutide, Ozempic, weight gain during the aging process, how we must also address our lifestyle, and more. 

Erin and Anissa join us to discuss peptides, semaglutide, Ozempic, weight loss during the aging process, how we must also address our lifestyle, and more. Semaglutide itself is a series of amino acids.” 

“We don’t wake up one day and we’re obese. We slowly but surely throughout the lifespan, through environmental factors, lifestyle factors, genetic factors, etc. can gain weight.” 

“The average woman over the age of 45, 45% of us are obese; not overweight.” 

“When you can personalize the care that you’re offering and giving those specific, actionable routes, I do think that it creates this opportunity to carry that forward on their own terms.” 

“Maybe the Groupon versions of semaglutide are promoting shot only but I would imagine that even they are not. This is a component of a person’s life. It is not the only thing that we hope that they are doing to pursue their own health.”

Listen to the SuperAge podcast wherever you get your pods.

See medical disclaimer below. ↓

5 COMMENTS

  1. David, you were very tough on your guests and it made me very uncomfortable. I was sitting here thinking with all the crazy diets out there… who is going to sue all of them. How about the HCG diet, the Keto diet, the starvation diet? I’ve been on all of them. Where are the muscles going on those diets? Down the drain, right? These women are providing a drug with all the support to keep that from happening, but you hammered them like they were selling opium. Sedentary lifestyle is the enemy and I want you to show me any 60 or 70 year old women who can lose weight by only going to the gym. No, you have to eat less and that is the hard part especially when you gain weight on 1200 calories a day. I’ve worked in the retirement business for years….our residents were not obese, you know why? The obese people have already died of some related disease. Yes many of the skinny ones died as a result of fractured hips, but they were 90 years old. Your a muscle guy and that is your focus, I get it. but sometimes it wears me out!

  2. Thanks Connie! Love your comments. Lifestyle is so key, as you point out, but you’re also right that sometimes, a little help (like semaglutide) can help kickstart losing weight that is causing problems – whether healthwise or just mentally. Thanks for sharing your perspective!

  3. I thought your attitude towards this fairly new protocol was right on. Weight loss drugs and surgeries have caused unintended harm to many. Increased incidence of osteoporosis is a not-uncommon side effect of surgical stomach reduction. Phen-fen caused heart valve problems, independent of lifestyle changes. Phentermine on its own causes elevated liver enzymes, And, of course, weight re-gain can occur, and often does, after surgery and when meds are discontinued even when lifestyle changes are implemented. Compounding pharmacies have their own checkered past. This is not a short term “kickstart” to weight loss that can then be maintained by diet and lifestyle modification. It’s a drug that will likely need be taken for life. I believe this medication will be life-saving for some. Those hoping for a kick-start are likely to be sorely disappointed. And those taking it long-term would be wise to pay special attention to potential bone loss and muscle wasting. Circling back to the way you pushed back on this, if you hadn’t shone a light on potential issues, this would have been the first and last podcast I listened to on your channel. Kudos to you.

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The ideas expressed here are solely the opinions of the author and are not researched or verified by AGEIST LLC, or anyone associated with AGEIST LLC. This material should not be construed as medical advice or recommendation, it is for informational use only. We encourage all readers to discuss with your qualified practitioners the relevance of the application of any of these ideas to your life. The recommendations contained herein are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. You should always consult your physician or other qualified health provider before starting any new treatment or stopping any treatment that has been prescribed for you by your physician or other qualified health provider. Please call your doctor or 911 immediately if you think you may have a medical or psychiatric emergency.

AUTHOR

Taylor Marks
Taylor Marks is a certified holistic health coach and professionally trained chef from The Institute of Culinary Education. Her passions include the latest research in health science, culinary arts, holistic wellness, and guiding others towards feeling their best.

 

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